Robin Adams - Wilt

We first tipped you to Scottish acoustician Robin Adams a little more than a year ago, calling attention to the Glasgow-based songsmith's moody folk songcraft rendered dark, deep and marinated in rich melancholy. "Pared back to mostly the intimate confines of finger-picked guitar and voice," we opined, "Adams' music combines selected aspects of the Brit folk tradition while adding that special near-mystical quality through some skillfully opaque lyricism." New album Wilt is even more spare and and unsparing, a collection of somber, atmospheric songs best consumed alone, focused (maybe a shot of whiskey would be better, actually) and ready to spend a half hour or so delving into what Adam's himself calls, certainly with a gloomy half-smile and shrug, "extremely miserable." The kicker, of course, is that this is time well spent. "Lay down your terror, lay down your dread, lay down your panic, lay down your head," Adams sings with an ominous edge in "Need Not Turn." Start there and see if you're ready for more. Hopefully, the answer is yes.

Robin Adams - "Need Not Turn" (from Wilt)

Robin Adams - "Must Be Dreaming" (from Wilt)

Stream (and buy) the full Wilt at Bandcamp.

 

With his last two hugely contrasting albums ‘Be Gone’ and ‘Train Crash Choir’ released simultaneously in late 2011, earning critical acclaim in Q magazine, The Skinny and Is This Music among others, Scottish song man Robin Adams returns to the table, this time around offering up one petite record of nine hauntingly bleak acoustic songs to suit the mood of a seasonal swing back into winter’s depths.

The album came about somewhat spontaneously while Adams was working on a larger album of yet unreleased material, when he discovered many of the songs being discarded as a result of not fitting one vision, were strangely suited to each other. The result was ‘Wilt’, an album of predominantly short and simply arranged songs, each with its own unique portrayal of an ethereal detachment from reality.

 

With his last two hugely contrasting albums ‘Be Gone’ and ‘Train Crash Choir’ released simultaneously in late 2011, earning critical acclaim in Q magazine, The Skinny and Is This Music among others, Scottish song man Robin Adams returns to the table, this time around offering up one petite record of nine hauntingly bleak acoustic songs to suit the mood of a seasonal swing back into winter’s depths.

The album came about somewhat spontaneously while Adams was working on a larger album of yet unreleased material, when he discovered many of the songs being discarded as a result of not fitting one vision, were strangely suited to each other. The result was ‘Wilt’, an album of predominantly short and simply arranged songs, each with its own unique portrayal of an ethereal detachment from reality.